No. 46 Spreading the word
By Tiiu-Imbi Miller | Newsletter No. 46 November 2013

 

Some of you may have missed the last two newsletters as they were sent from a different email address. Nos. 45 and 45A are now on our website.  Click on 2013 in the drop down menu from News.

It is estimated that there are 200 to 300 million slash and burn farmers worldwide. Good though it is to support poor farmers in the places where our partners are working, it is very encouraging to see that many community leaders from around the tropical belt have contacted us. The Inga system is simple and we now have manuals that we can send them, even if we cannot provide financial assistance, at least not at present. We are also gaining valuable practical tips from our partners, which will be published on our website, so that shared experiences will benefit all. We may be a drop in the ocean, but it is a drop that is making ripples.

 

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Each red star represents an enquirer. Of course it is very early days, and some of these are more serious about it than others. The ones in Cameroon have been incorporated into Gaston Bityo’s Cameroon Inga Project and are doing good work.

Inga edulis is native to the Western Amazon, but it makes a great shade tree for coffee and so has been introduced throughout most of the tropical belt. Few problems have been experienced as a result. For a discussion of the issue of using it as an introduced species see our July 2012 newsletter. However too much dependence on any one species is not a good idea, and we have been supporting Dr. Guillermo Valle’s research into possible alternative species.

We ourselves have also been making contacts.I gave a short presentation on the work of our partner, FunaVid, at the Conference on Honduras in September. This was a well attended gathering of NGOs, business and governmental institutions, attended also by the American ambassador, to discuss many issues dealing with sustainable development in Honduras.

 

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                Introductory notice at the conference

 

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The photo I took of the FunaVid display at the conference. Left to right are Mrs. Dodson, Dr. Dodson and Mrs. Adriana Ramos.

In July Rainforest Saver had a stall at the London Permaculture Festival, where we got considerable interest from many people. We are pursuing further links with the Permaculture movement. Inga alley cropping can be considered to be a form of Permaculture. We also sold some cards and T-shirts in aid of our funds, and organised a little quiz on rainforests.

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The Rainforest Saver table at the London Permaculture Festival, showing ourinformation display about Inga alley cropping, and cards and T-shirts for sale.

 

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          The Festival was a lively, well attended affair, with a performance and party afterwards.